India Cardiac Surgery Site is associated with experienced cardiologists to deliver the perfect treatment and recuperative plan. Before the surgery, we will educate the patient with every fact involved in surgery and maintain the transparency in procedure, facilities and the related costs. We provide quality services and also assists with arrangements by keeping the concerns of the international patients in mind, providing you the utmost care and professionalism.

How to Get Started?

Planning your medical trip to India is a very simple process with India Cardiac surgery site

1. You just need to fill in our enquiry form and one of our executives will contact you soon.

2. +91-9370586696 Call us at the given contact number for any assistance.

3. Complete information regarding surgery is provided on our website.

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Spinal Cord Stimulation (SCS)

Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a medical therapy for people who suffer from certain types of chronic pain. SCS involves the use of an implanted device-a spinal cord stimulator (sometimes called a generator or pacemaker for pain) -to deliver mild electrical pulses directly to nerve fibers. This direct approach to treating pain at its source can be very effective.

Spinal cord stimulation has three significant advantages:

  1. SCS can be very effective in reducing chronic pain from certain conditions.
  2. You can have an SCS trial before you have a permanent system implanted, which allows you to see if the therapy works for you.
  3. The implanted device can be turned off permanently or removed if you do not achieve the desired level of relief
  4. Each type of SCS system has advantages and disadvantages. Should you consider getting a spinal cord stimulator, you and your physician will decide which system is best for your situation. This decision will be based on factors such as your pain pattern, your lifestyle, and how much electrical energy is required to provide adequate pain relief.
Check out the Patient Testimonial, where the patient shares about their success stories from treatments through India Cardiac Surgery Consultants.

 What to Expect Before Spinal Cord Stimulation (SCS)?

SCS Trial Information

If you are a candidate for spinal cord stimulation (SCS), you will probably have a stimulation trial first, to find out how well you respond to SCS, before you commit to a full system implantation. During the SCS trial, a lead or leads are implanted temporarily and are connected to a trial spinal cord stimulator. Then, the trial stimulator is programmed with one or more stimulation programs that are customized to cover your areas of pain.

The SCS trial allows you to:

  1. Decide if spinal cord stimulation therapy is effective for the type, location, and severity of your chronic pain.
  2. Evaluate the effectiveness of different stimulation settings and programs
  3. Help decide which system (conventional implantable pulse generator, rechargeable implantable pulse generator, or radiofrequency) will provide the greatest possible level of relief, both immediately and over time, if your pain gets worse or spreads.

If spinal cord stimulation does provide sufficient pain relief, a second procedure will be scheduled to implant additional components, after you and     your physician select your permanent system.

If spinal cord stimulation does not work for you, the trial system is removed and you can explore other options.

Before the SCS Trial Procedure

Before the procedure, your ANS representative will explain what will happen during the procedure and answer any questions. Next you will be taken to a surgery suite and placed on your stomach on the procedure table. The nurse will make you as comfortable as possible and monitor your heart rate. The anesthesiologist may give you medication to help you relax. This medication may make you feel drowsy too.

Complications & Risks of Spinal Cord Stimulation

As with any surgical procedure or pain therapy, side effects can occur. Although the risk of complications is low, you should discuss all risk factors and concerns with your physician.

Spinal cord stimulation systems have been used successfully in thousands of people over the last two decades. Spinal cord stimulation treatment is also reversible, meaning that you can have the system removed or turned off  permanently anytime.

In general, you should avoid getting your incisions or sutures wet. This requires taking sponge baths until your physician says you can bathe or shower again.

Keep your incision site clean by changing your dressing and applying ointments as directed by your physician. If you notice drainage, pus, redness, or swelling in the incision area, if you have fever or chills, or if you feel excessive pain, call your physician immediately. These symptoms could signify an infection.

Indications for Use

  • Chronic, intractable pain of the trunk and limbs.
  • Contraindications
  • Demand-type cardiac pacemakers, patients who are unable to operate the system or who fail to receive effective pain relief during trial stimulation.
  • Warnings & Precautions
  • Diathermy therapy, cardioverter defibrillators, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), explosive or flammable gases, theft detectors and metal screening devices, lead movement, operation of machinery and equipment, postural changes, pediatric use, pregnancy, and case damage. Patients who are poor surgical risks, with multiple illnesses, or with active general infections should not be implanted.
  • Adverse Events
  • Painful stimulation, loss of pain relief, surgical risks (e.g., paralysis).

What to Expect During Spinal Cord Stimulation?

What to Expect During the Trial Procedure?

During the procedure, the physician will place one or more leads in the area along the spinal cord. The leads are typically inserted using a small needle. The exact placement depends upon the location of your pain.

Once the leads are placed, your participation begins. You will be woken up and your leads will be tested to be sure they are in the right place to treat your pain. You will be asked questions such as, “Do you feel a tingling sensation: Where do you feel the tingling? Does the tingling cover your pain?” By answering these questions, you will help make sure the leads are positioned well.

Finally, a dressing will be applied to cover the area where the leads exit your back. Then you will be taken to a recovery room.

What to Expect During the Permanent Procedure?

Before the procedure starts, you will be lightly sedated. Your trial leads (if present) will be removed. If percutaneous (under the skin) leads are used, a local anesthetic will be administered while the leads are placed, then you’ll be put under general anesthesia while the rest of the system is implanted. If surgical leads are used, you’ll likely be under general anesthesia the entire time.

Once the leads and generator are in place, connected and working, your surgeon will apply sutures and dressings, and you’ll be slowly withdrawn from anesthesia.

Implanting an SCS System

If the spinal cord stimulation (SCS) trial provides adequate pain relief, you will probably return to the operating room to have the permanent system implanted. Remember, even though an SCS system is called permanent, spinal cord stimulation is a reversible therapy. If you want to discontinue treatment at any time, the implanted parts can be turned off or removed.

What to Expect After Spinal Cord Stimulation?

What to Expect After the Trial Procedure?

Once you are settled in the recovery room, your ANS representative will most likely visit with you. Under the supervision of a physician or nurse, your representative will show you how to use the stimulator to change programs (if you are given more than one program) and how to adjust the strength of the stimulation so you can experiment with what makes you comfortable.

Before you leave the hospital or surgery center, you will learn to care for the area around the leads. You will be instructed to keep the area dry. This means you can only take sponge baths during the trial period. You will also be told what activities to avoid, such as extreme lifting and bending. However, you may be encouraged to try light activities, such as walking, so you can see if SCS therapy relieves your pain enough to allow you to do more of the things you want to do.

When you get home, you will be able to test how well the stimulation helps control your pain throughout the day and during different activities. You will jot notes in your trial diary to track which programs you use and how the stimulation covers your pain. Several days of more after surgery, you will either return to your physician’s office for a follow-up visit, or a member of the physician’s staff will call you to see how you are doing. At the end of the trial period, you and your physician will decide if you should have a permanent system and, if so, which type of system is appropriate.

What to Expect After the Permanent Procedure?

After the procedure, you’ll rest quietly until the physician taking care of you decides you are awake and well enough to leave. Keep in mind that, while most patients are sent home the same day, your physician may decide you require a longer hospital stay.

Before you are released from the hospital or day surgery unit, you will learn how to care for your incisions and will be told what activities you should do or avoid. You may get several programs to try for a week or so, after which any needed adjustments will be made on a return visit to your physician’s office. You will learn how to adjust the level of stimulation to manage your pain as it changes throughout the day. Any questions you may have about living with your SCS system will be answered, and you will receive a video and a detailed user’s guide with phone numbers to call for more information.

In general, you should avoid getting your incisions or sutures wet. This means you will have to take sponge baths until your physician says you can bathe or shower again. You should also keep your incision site clean by changing your dressing and applying ointments as directed by your physician. If you notice drainage, pus, redness, or swelling in the incision area, if you have fever or chills, or if you feel excessive pain, call your physician immediately. These symptoms could signify an infection.

The weeks following your implantation surgery can be an exciting time as you become familiar with your spinal cord stimulator, begin to take control over chronic pain, and gradually begin to do more of the things that you want to do. Most patients find that living with a spinal cord stimulator requires no extra time or effort in their life, which can be an important first step toward a healthier, more active, and more fulfilling lifestyle.

FAQ’s
  • Why should a patient choose India Cardiac Surgery Consultants for cardiac care?
    • India Cardiac Surgery Consultants provide a vast number of high quality cardiac services. The cardiac team includes board-certified cardiologists and cardiac surgeons, specially trained nurses, and registered technologists. The cardiac team at uses the most advanced technologies available to perform the cardiac procedures and has a lower complication rate.

     

  • What is spinal cord stimulation?
    • Spinal cord stimulation is a therapy that involves using a small implanted device that delivers low-level electrical pulses to targeted nerves along the spinal cord. This block pain signals from traveling up the spinal cord to the brain. This therapy can be very helpful in treating pain from certain conditions.

     

  • What does the spinal cord stimulation therapy involve?
    • Spinal cord stimulation requires a minor surgical procedure to implant a small electronic device under the skin and to place electrodes in the space above the spinal cord (called the epidural space).

     

  • What does spinal cord stimulation feel like?
    • The sensation is different for everyone. Some people describe SCS as a pleasant tingling. Ideally, the stimulation should be located in areas where you usually feel pain, and the sensation should be pleasant.

     

  • Does spinal cord stimulation (SCS) require major surgery?
    • Not necessarily, but most often the procedure requires the sterile conditions of an operating room to implant the internal components of the spinal cord stimulation system. The surgery may be performed at the hospital on an outpatient basis or at a day surgery center.

     

  • How many surgeries are required?
    • Implantation is usually done in two steps: a trial implantation and a permanent implantation. The trial lets you and your physician try out the system to see if it will give you enough pain relief. The trial also lets your physician see your power and programming needs so he or she can decide which type of permanent spinal cord stimulation system will give you the best pain relief. If spinal cord stimulation adequately controls your pain, you will return to the operating room to receive a permanent system. Although it is called permanent, spinal cord stimulation is completely reversible therapy. If you want to stop treatment, you can simply turn off the device or have the implanted components removed.

     

  • Where is the lead implanted?
    • One or more leads are inserted in the epidural space above the spinal cord using a small needle or through an incision. The exact placement of the lead or leads depends upon your pain pattern.

     

  • Where is the generator (or stimulator) implanted?
    • It is usually implanted in the buttocks or abdominal region, but it can be placed in other comfortable areas. You and your physician will decide where to place the device.

     

  • Will I feel the device under my skin?
    • Once the surgical wound heals, most people say that it is easy to forget that the device is there. You may experience some discomfort while the surgical incision heals. This is perfectly normal and signals that the healing process has begun.

     

  • How soon after surgery can I return to a more active lifestyle?
    • Your physician will help you determine what activities are appropriate and when it is safe to increase your activity level. Most patients are encouraged to gradually resume light exercise, such as walking and gardening. This will help to build your strength and lift your spirits.

     

  • Can I use the stimulator 24 hours a day?
    • Spinal cord stimulation can be used around the clock, if necessary. Many people get pain relief during the day and set the system to shut off while they are asleep. This can be done because there is often a carryover effect of pain relief. Additionally, shutting off the system conserves the battery. Other people use their systems, while sleeping. Patients and their physicians determine the best stimulation schedule to control pain.

     

  • Can I actually control the stimulation therapy?
    • Yes and no. It depends on the type of spinal cord stimulation system you receive. Therapy is controlled using the programmer (IPG or rechargeable IPG system) or transmitter (RF system). In all cases, the programmer or transmitter lets you turn the stimulator on and off, and it also lets you adjust the stimulation strength. With lesser-featured systems, you have to return to your physician to make virtually any other adjustments.

     

  • Can I shower or swim with the stimulator?
    • Yes. However, if you have an RF system, you’ll first have to remove the antenna and transmitter.

     

  • Is it safe to use household appliances or cellular equipment with my stimulator?
    • Yes. It is safe to use pagers, computers, and standard household appliances (including microwave ovens) with your system. The safety and effectiveness of use with cell phones have not been tested yet. Department store and airport security gates or theft detectors may cause an increase or decrease in stimulation when you pass through the gate. This sensation is temporary and should not harm your system. However, as a precaution, you should turn off your system before passing through security gates.

     

  • Is it safe to use household appliances or cellular equipment with my stimulator?
    • Yes. It is safe to use pagers, computers, and standard household appliances (including microwave ovens) with your system. The safety and effectiveness of use with cell phones have not been tested yet. Department store and airport security gates or theft detectors may cause an increase or decrease in stimulation when you pass through the gate. This sensation is temporary and should not harm your system. However, as a precaution, you should turn off your system before passing through security gates.

     

  • Is it safe to use household appliances or cellular equipment with my stimulator?
    • Yes. It is safe to use pagers, computers, and standard household appliances (including microwave ovens) with your system. The safety and effectiveness of use with cell phones have not been tested yet. Department store and airport security gates or theft detectors may cause an increase or decrease in stimulation when you pass through the gate. This sensation is temporary and should not harm your system. However, as a precaution, you should turn off your system before passing through security gates.

     

  • Can I drive with the stimulator on?
    • No. Spinal cord stimulation should not be used while operating a motor vehicle or other heavy equipment. If you are driving, you will need to turn the stimulator off. However, you can ride as a passenger with the stimulator on.

     

  • Will spinal cord stimulation allow me to return to work?
    • Your physician will help you make this decision. Some people, depending on their condition and occupation, are able to return to work while using spinal cord stimulation. However, returning to work should be a goal you and your physician set, not a requirement for successful therapy.

     

  • Can I travel with the stimulator?
    • Yes. Metal detectors and anti-theft devices may detect your spinal cord stimulation system, but your patient identification card will help to clear you through these checkpoints. Thousands of people have implanted medical devices, such as pacemakers, so the security personnel will know what to do. When flying, it is important to follow the flight crew’s instructions and turn the stimulator off for take off and landing.

     

If you are really seeking for Spinal Cord Stimulation in India, kindly fill up the form for a free consultation with our expert cardiologists. You will be provided with thorough analysis and suggestions regarding the Spinal Cord Stimulation you are seeking for.
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This Page has 3 comments

  1. Hi, I am Mohd Ali from Kenya. I was in New Delhi, India for the back surgery for by back pain. My spine was in a mess, and in India I got the best treatment and care. The hospital and doctors were competitive in respect of facilities and expertise. I thank them all and recommend the same to others.

    Reply
  2. Hey, this is Johanna from Canada. I went to India for the procedure – spinal cord stimulation. I am glad I got the best service from the Indian doctor. The hospital was high end and I highly recommend the same to one and all.

    Reply
  3. Hey this is Joey from Ireland for which I ventured to India for its treatment. The surgery I had in India was a big success and I can now recommend anyone for this high quality and affordable healthcare service in this place.

    Reply

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